How to Graph Radical Functions -- video and free printable cheat sheet

In this post is a video and free cheat sheet for graphing radical functions. In the video, I walk through the steps to graph a radical function by first identifying the parent function and the shifts, then using the shifts to create a table that we then graph. This is the easiest way I have found to graph radical functions because it's super straightforward with a step by step approach.

There's more than one way to do everything, including graphing nonlinear functions. The method for graphing radical functions in this post is by far my favorite and one that I learned from my superhero co-teacher Ms. Sullivan. She was the best. Inclusion is the best.

In this post is a step-by-step video for how to graph radical functions and a free printable radical functions cheat sheet (the one I'm holding in the photo).


In this post is a video and free cheat sheet for graphing radical functions. In the video, I walk through the steps to graph a radical function by first identifying the parent function and the shifts, then using the shifts to create a table that we then graph. This is the easiest way I have found to graph radical functions because it's super straightforward with a step by step approach.

Before co-teaching with Ms. Sullivan, I used to have students think of radicals as inverse quadratics, looking for the places the radical evaluated to a perfect square and working backwards to create a table. I do still use this method to get additional points after shifting our parent table, but relying entirely on this method was a little confusing for some of my kids. 

A way better approach (in my opinion) is identifying the parent function, creating a table, shifting the table, and graphing the shifted table. As an added bonus, this method also works for other nonlinear functions, like logs and exponentials.

So the video in this post and the free cheat sheet focus on this shifting method for graphing radicals.

I have a grand plan to make videos to go along with all of the free math cheat sheets on my blog because video has gotten me through more than one tough course. Youtube wasn't a thing when I was in college, but let me tell you the site was my best bud all throughout graduate school. As a visual learner, videos are super important to me and are always my go-to. So my plan is to bring my math cheat sheets to life with video examples of how they are used. I hope they are helpful.

Below is a link to the graphing radical functions video and free cheat sheet.


Video:



Free cheat sheet:

In this post is a video and free cheat sheet for graphing radical functions. In the video, I walk through the steps to graph a radical function by first identifying the parent function and the shifts, then using the shifts to create a table that we then graph. This is the easiest way I have found to graph radical functions because it's super straightforward with a step by step approach.
Graphing Radical Functions Cheat Sheet


More:

See all free math cheat sheets here


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