Digital Math Escape Rooms

Digital Math Escape Rooms

In this post you'll find no-prep digital math escape room activities that are fun for students and eliminate your need to grade! These self-checking digital math escape rooms are built in Google Forms with no outside links. The directions are simple -- enter a 4-letter code to advance to the next puzzle -- so students can focus all of their energy on their math. 

To meet the growing need for digital resources, I have spent the last couple years updating my printable math activities to also include digital versions (you can read more about those here) and making some digital-only math activities in Google Slides and Forms. One of the newest digital-only activities are digital math escape rooms.


Digital Math Escape Rooms


Teachers are using digital math escape rooms as review, as independent, partner or group classwork, as station activities, and even as concept reinforcement during summer school. They can be assigned to individual students or worked on in pairs/groups. Digital math escape rooms are also nice paper-savers when students have access to technology.


digital math escape rooms

Digital math escape rooms have been getting some great feedback from teachers and students:


"My students were talking about one of these in the hallways (another teacher overheard them). They said it was the best lesson in their lives. Thanks! Looking forward to having more of those lessons!"


"I've greatly enjoyed using escape room activities with students in the past and struggled with how to implement those types of activities virtually. This activity did a great job of merging the concepts and skills of parallel & perpendicular lines with the fun and intrigue of an escape room! " - Elizabeth J. 


"This was SOOO much fun to use with my students. They Loved everything about the escape room! Thank you!!" - Dani B.


"I like to spice up my teaching by offering my students a variety of math activities. Students are challenged with solving the math problems and they stay engaged. I time them to see who can unlock the locks first. Exciting!" - Leinani K.


"I love these activities and so do my students. We both love the self-checking factor: me because it actually requires my students to trouble shoot what they are doing incorrectly and gives them some motivation to figure out the solution; them because it is a 100 if they can escape and they enjoy the process of trying to breakout." - Kristin K.


This feedback made me so happy to read because it was exactly what I had hoped these digital math escape rooms would be-- engaging, easy to access for all students and timesavers for teachers.


How do these digital math escape rooms work?

Each math escape room is built in Google Forms with no outside links. Everything is housed within the Google Form. This way you never have to worry that a link will be blocked or broken. 

Each escape room consists of 5 puzzles. In each puzzle there are 4 questions to answer. Once students answer the 4 questions, they find their answers in the answer choices grid. This will generate a 4-letter code. Entering that code into the answer box on the Form will unlock the lock. There are 5 locks to unlock in each escape room activity. Each escape room is set with response validation, giving students the instant feedback they love and eliminating your need to grade.


DIGITAL MATH ESCAPE ROOMS


Important note: You can still assign these digital escape rooms if you are not in a Google school. If your students do not have Google logins, but you do have access to your own Google Drive, you can still assign these digital math escape rooms to students. Students do not need to log into Google or even have Google accounts. As long as you can house the escape room on your own Google Drive, and Google is not blocked on student devices, you can send it to students no matter which learning platform your school uses. Directions for sending the escape room to students are within the escape room PDF file (the link to the digital escape room is also embedded within the PDF).


Finding Slope Digital Math Escape Room
Finding slope digital math escape room



Browse digital math escape rooms:


Adding and Subtracting Integers Digital Math Escape Room

 

Fraction Review Digital Math Escape Room


GCF and LCM Digital Math Escape Room


Domain and Range Digital Math Escape Room


Graphing Linear Equations Digital Math Escape Room


Coordinate Plane Digital Math Escape Room


Order of Operations Digital Math Escape Room


2-Step Equations Digital Math Escape Room


Pythagorean Theorem Digital Math Escape Room 


Quadratic Word Problems Digital Math Escape Room


Pi Day Digital Math Escape Room for Middle School


Finding Slope Digital Math Escape Room


> Browse all 80+ digital math escape rooms here.




Digital Math Escape Room Bundle


Digital Math Escape Room Bundle for Middle School
Digital math escape room bundle for middle school

"This is one of the greatest purchases I have ever bought from TpT" -Kristi T

"BEST BUNDLE EVER. My students say they LOVE the problems in these escapes. I have used many of the escapes this year, and I LOVE that they cannot submit the assignment until all of the questions are answered correctly. Thank you so much for making this resource!"  -Lori M. 

"I love these activities and so do my students. We both love the self-checking factor: me because it actually requires my students to trouble shoot what they are doing incorrectly and gives them some motivation to figure out the solution; them because it is a 100 if they can escape and they enjoy the process of trying to breakout." -Kristin K


If your students are in middle school, this digital math escape room bundle includes digital math escape rooms for integers, like terms, fractions, decimals, percents, the coordinate plane, expressions, exponents, GCF & LCM, mean, median, mode and range, area and circumference of circles, probability, angle pair relationships, ratios, slope, ordering rational numbers, 1-step equations, 1-step inequalities, 2-step equations, 2-step inequalities, unit rates, area, perimeter and volume, geometric transformations and composite figures. 

There are also escape room bundles available for algebra, geometry, and upper elementary school.


Sending the escape room to students:


It's simple to send a digital math escape room to students. These directions are also inside each escape room's PDF: 

1) Once the escape room is in your Google Drive, open it and click the purple "send" in the upper right corner. A popup window will appear.


2) In the popup, click the link icon, copy this link and share the link with students. This is the only link students will need to complete the activity.


I hope your students enjoy the escape rooms! 










28 comments:

  1. I would love to have an escape room for all the factoring methods: GCF, grouping, a=1, a>1, special cases (perfect square trinomials, difference of two squares).

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    1. You got it! I will get this on my list. Can you please send me an email so I can send it to you when done? shana@scaffoldedmath.com

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    2. Me, too! Would be SO helpful!

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    3. That would be amazing!

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  2. I would love to see one with exponents, and one with logs. Thank you.

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    1. Hi Inna! I completed the solving logarithms escape room and would love to get it to you! My email is shana@scaffoldedmath.com

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  3. Is it possible you have one with 2nd grade addition and subtraction with regrouping. The students can master it without regrouping but get confused when they need to regroup.

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    1. Hi Cassandra, I'd love to chat about this. I'd like to make sure to get the problem types and format right for kids that young. My email is shana@scaffoldedmath.com

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  4. I'd love to see a digital breakout room that uses the properties of quadrilaterals-parallelograms, square, rectangle, rhombus, kite, trapezoid

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    1. Hi DeeCee, thank you for your comment. My email address is shana@scaffoldedmath.com if you'd like to send me an email about this. I will think about how to frame the questions to ask students about quadrilaterals.

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  5. I'm thinking about making a digital escape room involving the main algebraic skills my geometry students will need second semester: Solving linear equations, solving systems of linear equations, solving proportions, and solving quadratic equations using square roots. If YOU made one instead, I'm sure I'd purchase it!

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    1. I will give this one some thought! If you'd like it when it's done, my email is shana@scaffoldedmath.com. I like to send them via email as a thank you for the topic idea.

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  6. I love these!! Is it possible to have one for solving exponential & logarithmic equations?
    Thank you so much for sharing!!!

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    1. Hi Ale! I finished the logarithmic equations digital escape room and would love to get it to you. My email is shana@scaffoldedmath.com

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  7. Hi,
    Just purchased three of the digital escape rooms. I wasn't feeling well and needed to find something quick for my students to do since I was leaving school. I love that you have them for multiple subject areas in math. Can you make one for Surface Area and Volume?

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    1. Thank you, Natasha. I hope you feel better soon. Can you please send me an email? I just have a couple questions about the shapes. I'll email it to you when it's done as a thank you for the topic suggestion. shana@scaffoldedmath.com

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    2. Just coming back to update that I made an escape room for surface area and volume (of cones, cylinders and spheres:)

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  8. I sent you an email about doing a possible escape room on polynomial naming & operations review. Hopefully it is something you can do. I have a bit of a short turn around time. thanks!

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    1. I hope your students enjoy the escape room, Mary Anne!

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  9. I've been wanting to use escape rooms for a while. I teach Geometry and would love to add these to engage the students. Is it possible that you can make one for Points, Lines, and Planes? Or at least create a template for teachers to make their own for any topics that don't have an escape room yet?

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    1. Hi Akira, thank you for your comment. I make the images in PowerPoint then import them into Google Forms, so a template would be hard. But I am happy to make one for points, lines and planes and email it to you. My email is shana@scaffoldedmath.com.

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  10. I love using digital escape rooms! Any suggestions on how to use them most effectively with an unleveled class (i.e., special education, inclusion, honors, CP students are mixed in one class)? Any feedback is welcome!

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    1. Unleveled classes bring their own set of challenges. My classes were unleveled when I taught in Boston. My suggestion would be for kids to work together (if possible) as partners. You could also make a copy of the escape room and delete a section (or two) from the copy so that some students/pairs of students complete 3 or 4 puzzles instead of all 5. If you need help doing this, my email is shana@scaffoldedmath.com.

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  11. AnonymousJuly 15, 2022

    Do you have an escape room bundle of only 6th grade math content? I see a "middle school math" bundle, but I won't need the 7th and 8th grade content. Maybe I need to just buy those all individually?

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    1. Hi there, I don't have a 6th grade only bundle right now, just for middle school.

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  12. Thank you for taking the time to create these escape rooms. They are much more student-friendly than some of the other ones I've seen on Teachers Pay Teachers and other websites. Oftentimes, when I have tried to use escape rooms I've bought or downloaded from other creators, I usually need to adapt them to meet my students' level. If I don't adapt then, then the activity needs to be teacher-led, as opposed to individual, group, or station work (which is not as fun or rewarding for students). Again, I just wanted to say that these look great, and I can't wait to use them with my 8th-grade resource students!

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    1. Thank you so much, Tarah. My goals for the digital math escape rooms were for them to be easy to assign and enjoyable for students, so this makes me so happy to hear:)

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