Spanish Math Word Walls

Some of my math word walls have included Spanish vocabulary for a few years. However, some [currently] do not. I'm happy to say that this is all changing. Over the next few months, and likely sooner, every one of my math word walls will be updated to include Spanish vocabulary. Above is a photo of how the Spanish math words look alongside their English counterparts.

Some of my math word walls have included Spanish vocabulary for a few years. However, some [currently] do not. I'm happy to say that this is all changing. Over the next few months, and likely sooner, the printable versions of every one of my math word walls will be updated to include Spanish vocabulary. Above is a photo of how the Spanish math words look alongside their English counterparts.

My Spanish is not where it would need to be to add the Spanish vocabulary myself, so I am working with a professional Spanish translator to translate the math vocabulary. He is a native Spanish speaker.

As soon as Spanish has been added to a math word wall, I will update it on this list: 


• 2nd Grade Math Word Wall - not yet updated

• 3rd Grade Math Word Wall - not yet updated

• 4th Grade Math Word Wall - Spanish included

• 5th Grade Math Word Wall - Spanish included

• 6th Grade Math Word Wall - Spanish included

• 7th Grade Math Word Wall - Spanish included

• 8th Grade Math Word Wall - Spanish included

• Algebra Word Wall - Spanish included

• Geometry Word Wall - Spanish included

• Algebra 2 Word Wall - not yet updated

• Unit Circle Word Wall - Spanish included

• Area Word Wall - not yet updated

• 3D Shapes Word Wall - not yet updated

• Financial Literacy Word Wall - not yet updated


If you own any of my math word walls, you can always re-download for free to get any updates. If it's been a while since your last re-download, all math word walls now include printable black & white, printable color and digital in GOOGLE Slides.





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Graphing Linear Equations and Inequalities Cheat Sheets

graphing linear equations and inequalities

At some point I will update this post with videos on how to graph linear equations and inequalities, but for now (and maybe to put the pressure on myself to get those videos done soon), I wanted to at least share the two cheat sheets I've made recently for these two topics.

Image of a graphing linear equations in slope intercept form math cheat sheet

The first is this graphing linear equations cheat sheet. It covers how to graph linear equations in slope-intercept form through two examples. The first example shows the basic steps when graphing a linear equation from a table when slope that is a positive integer. The second example extends to when slope is a fraction. Because the worksheet uses tables, students should be able to use it as a guide to when slope is negative. 
You can fond this graphing linear equations cheat sheet free here.


Image of a graphing linear inequalities in two variables math cheat sheet

The second is this graphing linear inequalities cheat sheet. It covers graphing inequalities in standard form. Because shading can get a little weird when graphing standard-form inequalities, the sheet walks students through setting up a table to find x and y intercepts, evaluating to find those intercepts, plotting the intercepts and then testing (0, 0) to determine which way to shade. In the example on the worksheet, we end up shading the opposite way from what it initially seems when we first see the inequality. You can find this graphing linear inequalities cheat sheet free here.


If you have students struggling with graphing equations and inequalities, I hope they find these sheets helpful. You can see all of my math cheat sheets here.


Linear equations and inequalities activities: 

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How to send a digital word wall to students

In this post, you will learn exactly how to send a digital word wall to students. The steps are super simple. You will be able to edit your digital word wall and those edits will magically appear on the word wall shared with students. Cool! Here is a short video tutorial:

Over the years, I've written a lot about math word walls and how strongly I feel about them. My teaching changed with the addition of math vocabulary references to our classroom walls, and I have so enjoyed all the great feedback from teachers abut the same being true in their classrooms. 

With so many teachers and students now learning online, I needed to (quickly) figure out a way teachers and students could now access their math word walls digitally. The thought of teachers no longer having access to their classroom bulletin boards made me so sad! So after a lot of thought about the formatting, I worked over the summer and into the early fall to convert every one of my math word walls to also work digitally in Google Slides. They are clickable and interactive and the format *almost* feels like a real classroom. I decided to use photographs of the word walls to give students the feeling of being in a classroom. Here is me taking [what I thought was] the last photo. Turns out I needed to take more, but it was a good moment. My back was relieved:

With so many teachers and students now learning online, I needed to (quickly) figure out a way teachers and students could access their math word walls digitally. The thought of teachers no longer having access to their classroom bulletin boards made me so sad! So after a lot of thought about the formatting, I worked over the summer and into the early fall to convert every one of my math word walls to also work digitally in Google Slides. They are clickable and interactive and the format *almost* feels like a real classroom. I decided to use photographs of the word walls to give students the feeling of being in a classroom. Here is me taking [what I thought was] the last photo.

In this post, I explain the exact steps to take to send your digital word wall to students. You can send a digital word wall just as you would any other Google Slides file, but I like the method outlined in this post better. Here's a short video tutorial:


What I like about this method is that students cannot edit the digital word wall but you can. This makes the word wall a great reference for students and a way for you to deliver information. When you edit your version of the word wall, the edits magically show up on the word wall you shared with students. Cool!

How to send a digital word wall to students

Steps to send your digital word wall to students:


1: Open your digital word wall


2: Go to file>share and make sure its set to "anyone with the link can view"


3: Copy the share link


4: Paste the share link somewhere to edit it. I use Word but you can paste it anywhere. 


5: At the end of the URL, change /edit?usp=sharing to /present


6: Copy and share the entire URL (ending in /present) with students. That's it!

Digital Math Word Walls in Google Slides


If you are in Google Classroom:

If you'd like to post the /present word wall link to Google Classroom for your students:


7: Copy the entire link with /present at the end.


8: Paste the link on the Stream tab for your students with a note about it being their math vocabulary wall.



Now, whenever you add to your digital word wall (notes, video links, etc.), students will see your edits on their digital word wall!

math word walls


Browse all math word walls.



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How-to Guide to Attacking Word Problems

Word problems don't all fit into the same neat little box. There is no one graphic organizer, or magical online math word problems solver, that works well for all word problems. Each word problem is completely unique. This has always felt so incredibly messy to me when it comes to teaching word problems.

Word problems confessional: I dread teaching them. They're one of those things I have had a hard time teaching. My personal word problem solving technique, if you can even call it that, goes something like: "Read it over and over and over again until it makes sense, cross out words I don't like because they're unnecessary and I don't like that they were added as a distraction, read it again, imagine myself in the problem, pull out the numbers, make them into an equation, does the equation make sense?, solve it, does the solution make sense?" How could I ever teach this? It's a heaping disaster!

Word problems don't all fit into the same neat little box. There is no one graphic organizer, or magical online math word problems solver, that works well for all word problems. Each word problem is completely unique. This has always felt so incredibly messy to me when it comes to teaching word problems. 

But this all changed when I came across this paper on George Pólya's Problem Solving Techniques. There are no graphic organizers, there is no overarching goal to fit everything into neat little boxes on a 1-pager. The messiness is expected and embraced and a welcomed part of it all. If you haven't heard of George Pólya's problem solving technique, here is a partial summary:

How to Move a File From One Google Drive to Another

In this post are simple directions for how to move a file from one Google Drive to another.

Have you ever downloaded a Google file for school, only to have it get "stuck" in your home Google Drive? Or maybe a file you'd like in your home Google Drive won't seem to budge from your school Drive? 

Below are simple directions for how to move a file from one Google Drive to another. I'll use the example of how to move a file from a school Google Drive to a personal Google Drive because I have gotten this question a lot! 

Activities for Teaching Unit Rate

Unit pricing is one of my favorite topics to teach in Consumer Math. There are endless examples of unit prices gone wrong, and they all give me a giggle. But as funny as they can be, it's important for kids to know how to calculate unit rates so that they can determine the best deals. Sometimes, or maybe a lot of the time, the best deal isn't always obvious. In this post are some of the photos I have taken of unit price fails and some unit price activities for students.

Unit rate is one of my favorite topics to teach in Consumer Math. There are endless examples of unit prices gone wrong, and they all give me a giggle. But as funny as they can be, it's important for kids to know how to calculate unit rates so that they can determine the best deals. Sometimes, or maybe a lot of the time, the best deal isn't always obvious.

In this post are some of the photos I have taken of unit price fails as well as some unit price activities I have made for students. Here are some photos I have taken over the years of unit prices gone wrong:

Mathematicians look like all of us project

A couple years ago, I realized that whenever I would talk about the mathematicians who created the math we were doing in class, there were a lot of similarities in the people that I was displaying on the board. In my class, no two students were alike. But every mathematician I was displaying looked the same. The following year, after my students took their end of year exam, I decided to spend the last few weeks of school doing a mathematician project. For this project, I had the students pick from a list of mathematicians that I gave them, fill out a bio sheet, and make a presentation. They got bonus points if they dressed up and presented as their mathematician of choice. I’ve enjoyed learning about mathematicians from around the world. I hope that by sharing with my friends, who share with their friends, and by the people who find me through my hashtag, that people will start to see that mathematicians look like all of us. It is not a field set aside just for European men in powdered wigs. Mathematicians come from all centuries, all countries, and all socioeconomic backgrounds. Mathematicians really do look like all of us!

Like so many awesome math teachers, I met Megan McLean through social media at some point over the last few years. Megan is a teacher all the way on the other side of the US, and with the help of Instagram, I get to feel like she is my colleague next door. Over the last few months, Megan has been researching mathematicians from all over the world and collecting their stories into her Instagram account @mathematicianslooklikeallofus. This post highlights a small sliver of the mathematicians she has found and also links to where we can learn more. Here is Megan's guest post on the work she has done so far on this important project.


Guest post by Megan McLean


Hi! I’m Megan McLean, a Math and Engineering teacher at Lewis and Clark High School in Spokane, Washington. I’ve been teaching for 13 years. In that time, I have taught in the US and also in South Korea, which was an amazing experience. In my former life, I was a Mechanical Engineer having gotten a BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Idaho (GO VANDALS!). I became a teacher because I wanted to inspire students to see themselves as mathematicians and to help develop in others the love I have for math.