Simple math test corrections template for students to reflect on their mistakes

Math test corrections template free pdf download - Scaffolded Math and Science

Simple math test corrections template for students to reflect on their mistakes - Scaffolded Math and ScienceWe all want to support a growth mindset in our students and give them space to learn from their mistakes, but what does this look like when teachers are in charge of teaching 100+ kids? 

Is it possible to allow students to correct their mistakes while also maintaining teacher sanity?

It is! And it’s so simple. In this post I want to share the test revision sheet I’ve used for many years that has allowed me to avoid “retakes” (cringe) and that has given my students a way to reflect on the growth of their understanding.

Simple math test corrections template for students to reflect on their mistakes

There are 3 columns on the template: the problem #, the Correct Answer and a Please Explain column. 

The Correct Answer column allows me to quickly scan for correct answers. If an answer is still incorrect, I award no credit. If the answer is correct in this column, I go on to read the Please Explain column to see if a solid explanation was given.

I allow students to use the Please Explain column in whatever way they feel is best. Some students choose to explain what they had done wrong. Others choose to explain what they now did right. Students do have to reflect in some way in this section to get credit.

Here is an example of how the sheet works:


Here are a few slope problems that are wrong and were deducted varying levels of credit. The student (me, since I am home this year) lost 12 points in this section of the quiz.


And here are the test corrections for 2 of the problems with explanations of what went wrong. 

I usually award 1/2 credit for every problem revised correctly, though some years and with some students I have awarded full credit for every correctly revised problem. I do this for a few reasons:

◉ To show the student that learning doesn't end with an F.

◉ That effort is everything in math. 

◉ That I appreciate their hard work and their willingness to face and correct their mistakes. 

◉ That I know they are busy with 100 other things, but that this is important.

I use this template for assessments but also with everyday assignments like task card activities and practice worksheets. My feeling is that if the student is willing to put in the effort to learn and revise, I am willing to award credit.

I also allow all students to use the template, whether they had originally earned an F or an A. 

You can find the pdf test corrections template in my free resource library here


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4 comments:

  1. I am curious what you do about test security if you have students who haven't taken the test yet and others that are working making corrections? Also what keeps students from simply finding a friend that got the questions correct and copying their work? Even with the explanation portion, I fear students taking the easy way out.

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    1. It’s a great question. Less students than I would expect to take me up on correcting their tests ever come to make corrections. And students do sometimes cheat by getting friends to help. To me, seeking help in any way is showing an effort that deserves to be rewarded. A lot of students don’t even care enough to cheat. I think about in terms of what I do when I don’t know something. I search online, I look for videos, I ask friends. Knowing how to find answers and help is an important skill. The amount of credit rewarded per corrected answer can vary. Or test corrections could only be allowed after school. And corrections could also be offered only after all kids have completed the assignment or test. There are lots of ways to make it work while also not giving ourselves a ton of extra work.

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  2. Thank you for this. I, too, award half credit. My students can only do revisions if they have completed the homework leading up to the quiz. I also sometimes give back full credit if I ask them to do revisions AND extra practice problems. It just depends on the concept. I use my quiz corrections as a take home assignment as well. I hardly ever use the same quiz year to year- so I am not too worried about test security. Thanks for letting me know I am on the same path as you in regards to quiz correction protocol.

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    1. I really like your idea that a student needs to complete all homework leading up to the assessment in order to do revisions. This seems more than fair and that it also targets the kids with test anxiety to give them a second chance. I love that. Thanks so much for your comment!

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