Desmos Math Art Project

While you're stuck at home with your own teenagers because of COVID-19 social distancing, or have been given the monumental task of teaching your math students remotely, what better way to engage than with a little math+art? Desmos has extended the deadline of their Global Math Art Contest to April 30, 2020 so that more students can participate as part of their distance learning. In this post are quick links, tutorials and example to get going on graphing with Desmos today.

While you're stuck at home with your own teenagers because of COVID-19 social distancing, or have been given the monumental task of teaching your math students remotely, what better way to engage than with a little math+art? Desmos has extended the deadline of their Global Math Art Contest to April 30, 2020 so that more students can participate as part of their distance learning. 


TL;DR:

 Use the free Desmos calculator to recreate an image from public domain.

 Submit it here: Google form

◾ New to Desmos and all its features? There is a Resources section below. 

◾ You can also check out Joe McCormack's desbot to see how equations come together to make an image:

Desbot
Joe McCormack,
Year 9
King Edward VI School,
Stratford-upon-Avon

Here is an announcement sent by Desmos's Johnny Lin:



Announcing the Desmos Global Math Art Contest 


Desmos logo

Desmos | March 06, 2020 

COVID19 has impacted many schools recently. We are extending the deadline to April 30, so more students can participate. 

In recent years, we’ve seen a growing number of classrooms around the world doing math art projects using Desmos. These projects involve using various equations and inequalities in our free Graphing Calculator to create some truly impressive pictures, often as a final project for a unit or even for the course. 

While you're stuck at home with your own teenagers because of COVID-19 social distancing, or have been given the monumental task of teaching your math students remotely, what better way to engage than with a little math and art? Desmos has extended the deadline of their Global Math Art Contest to April 20, 2020 so that more students can participate. In this post are quick links, tutorials and example to get going on graphing with Desmos today.

We’ve been so excited about the beautiful and creative math art that is being produced with Desmos that we wanted to create a space for students from around the world to submit entries and win prizes for their hard work. So this year, we’re running our first-ever Desmos Global Math Art Competition! 


Who Can Enter? 

Any student aged 13–18 may submit a Desmos graph to the competition via their teacher or a parent. Judging will be based on three age categories: 

 13–14 years old 

 15–16 years old 

 17–18 years old 


What Are We Looking For? 

Your original art created in the Desmos Graphing Calculator. (Original means that (a) you made it yourself and (b) it doesn’t contain any copyrighted images.) 

Want to impress our judges? We’re looking for submissions that have some combination of the following: 

Creativity and Originality including:

◾ Visual content 

 How you use the math you know 


Delight. There are lots of ways to show this, such as: 

 Beautiful visual design 

 Movement/animation 

 Sound using the audiotrace feature 

 Fine detail 


How Does the Judging Happen? 

Ten finalists in each of the three age categories will be selected by our in-house panel of judges. All 30 finalists’ graphs will be featured on our website and will then proceed to a final round of judging by a panel of guest judges. 


The Prizes: 

In each age category, the following prizes will be awarded: 

First Prize: $500 

Second Prize: $250 

Third Prize: $100 

All Finalists (including top 3 prize winners): 

All 30 finalists, including the top three in each category, will receive: 

 Desmos T-shirts for the winning student and their teacher 

 A Desmos-sponsored pizza party (or equivalent) for the entire class 


How to Submit Your Entry 

Students can submit their entries through the Graphing Calculator on Desmos.com. In addition, teachers can submit in bulk on behalf of their students. Here’s a Google form where teachers and parents can submit entries. Although we will only accept one graph entry per student, our form allows a teacher to upload graphs for multiple students if they desire. All submissions must be made on or before April 30th, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Standard Time. We will follow up by email with teachers or parents who submit graph entries that are selected to be finalists to ensure that we can properly credit the student. 


The Fine Print 

 All contestants must be ages 13–18. Submit graphs based on the age you will be on May 1, the date we announce winners. 

 We have excluded students under the age of 13 from this contest due to various international age restrictions in online privacy laws. 

 Each entry must be submitted by a responsible adult (teacher or parent), NOT by the student themself. 

 Each student may only enter one graph in the contest, although the responsible adult may submit multiple students’ entries at the same time. 

 When submitting, Desmos will collect only the responsible adult’s contact information along with students’ graphs. Prior to announcing any finalists or winners, we will contact the responsible adult of each finalist to determine how to contact and credit the student. 

 All graph submissions must be created using desmos.com/calculator

 All graphs must be the original work of the student. We cannot accept submissions that include copyrighted images. Specifically, submitted graphs may not include the use of content that is not the intellectual property of the person who made the graph. 

 Before distributing prizes, we reserve the right to verify students’ eligibility and application information. It is the teacher’s responsibility to ensure their students abide by local data privacy laws. 


Resources: 

Brand new to graphing with Desmos? Not so new, but want to learn more? Check out any of these links to get started. 

 Introduction to the Graphing Calculator 

 Learn how to shade

 Learn how to make polygons

 Learn how to animate using sliders

 Learn how to graph line segments or parts of curves

 This Desmos Classroom File Cabinet on mathcoachblog.com.

Questions? Contact us at contest@desmos.com


UPDATE 

In response to recent questions, we’d like to clarify a few points: 

1. We are accepting international submissions. In fact, we encourage them. 

2. While you cannot submit graphs of copyrighted images, you may submit graphs of works that are in the public domain



Need more remote teaching algebra ideas? Here is a recent blog post:




-Shana




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